The Road to Serfdom

The Road to Serfdom is a book written by the great Friedrich Hayek, recipient of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The book was printed in 1944 and Look Magazine ran the pamphlet version you see here in February 1945.

There is nothing new in the under the sun and it has all been done before.  Get down on your knees and pray we don’t get fooled again.

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2 Responses to The Road to Serfdom

  1. Roy Ryder says:

    Wow! Talk about a voice from the past coming back to haunt us. If only we could get this kind of thing in schools.

  2. R.D. Walker says:

    Central planning always fails. It is beyond the ability of the any central planner to manage the literally billions of market decisions made each day. Hayek argued that the failure of central planning would be perceived by the public as an absence of sufficient power by the state to implement an otherwise good idea. Such a perception would lead the public to vote more power to the state, and would assist the rise to power of a “strong man” perceived to be capable of “getting the job done”. After these developments Hayek argued that a country would be ineluctably driven into outright totalitarianism.

    Collectivism
    Democracy
    Centralized planning
    Strong, charismatic leadership
    National unity
    Government entitlements

    These are the ingredients for tyranny and these are the things an increasing number of Americans are calling for. Liberty cannot survive in this environment. Only when the government is limited to its legitimate role and minorities are protected from the passions of the masses can liberty and freedom exist. It is slipping away right before our very eyes.

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